Recruitment, retention, and intervention adherence for a chronic illness self-management intervention with the Apsáalooke Nation

  • Laurel Fimbel Montana State University
  • Mikayla Pitts Montana State University, Department of Health and Human Development, Bozeman, Montana
  • Dr. Mark Schure Montana State University, Department of Health and Human Development, Bozeman, Montana
  • Alma Knows His Gun McCormick Messengers for Health, Crow Agency, Montana
  • Dr. Suzanne Held Montana State University, Department of Health and Human Development, Bozeman, Montana

Abstract

Recruitment, retention, and adherence within health intervention research have been understudied in Indigenous communities, where well-known health disparities exist. The purpose of this paper is to describe planned versus actual recruitment, retention, and adherence strategies and the evaluation of retention and adherence strategies for a community-based research study of a Chronic Illness (CI) self-management intervention within an Indigenous community. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach was used to develop and implement Báa nnilah, a culturally consonant educational intervention to improve CI self-management.  Reasons for participant adherence and retention were tracked and recorded over time. A post-intervention survey assessed barriers and facilitators to intervention adherence. Overall, recruitment, retention, and adherence methods were successful in enrolling and maintaining participation. Using a CBPR approach and culturally consonant strategies may assist in meeting recruitment goals and improving sustained participation of community members, thus impacting health disparities among Indigenous communities. 

Section
Research Articles