Learning During COVID-19: Rapid E-Learning Transition at a Regional Medical School Campus

  • Ramey Moore College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Rachel Purvis College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Cari Bogulski Office of Community Health and Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Tina Maddox College of Health Professions, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Lauren Haggard-Duff College of Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Tom Schulz Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Scott Warmack College of Pharmacy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest
  • Angel Holland University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Pearl McElfish
Keywords: covid-19, e-learning, pedagogical knowledge and technology, regional medical campus, pandemic response in education

Abstract

COVID-19 has changed the day-to-day landscape of education for students, faculty, and staff worldwide, and this is especially true for students in health sciences and medical education programs. This paper explores the effects of the rapid shift to e-learning modalities for students at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, a regional medical campus located in Northwest Arkansas. A survey and open-ended written interview questions was conducted with a total of 144 student respondents and in-depth follow up interviews were conducted with 29 of those students. Utilizing descriptive statistics and qualitative descriptive analysis, the survey and interviews explored the effects of COVID-19 on the lived experiences of students as part of the transition to e-learning.  We found that 64.5% students reported satisfaction with the transition to e-learning as good or very good and the primary themes that influenced e-learning success for students were: Communication, technology, pedagogy, and community.

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Original Reports