Shifting the Opioid Conversation from Stigma to Strengths: Opportunities for Developing Community-Academic Partnerships

Authors

  • Robin Austin School of Nursing, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
  • Clarence Jones Hue-MAN Partnership https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9030-2368
  • Willie Dominguez Parents in Community Action
  • Diana Hawkins Hawthorne Neighborhood Council
  • Carren Ondara Abbott Northwestern Hospital
  • David Haynes Institute for Health Informatics, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
  • Karen Monsen School of Nursing, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0196-9799
  • Mickey Eder Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24926/ijps.v9i1.4671

Keywords:

Community-based participatory research, Opioids, Resilience, Community-academic partnership

Abstract

Background: Opioid misuse and abuse is a longstanding concern, particularly in underserved communities. Community-level data is needed to understand how to best address the opioid crisis. A strengths-based whole-person approach can offset challenges in working to maximize individual health.

Objectives: Project objectives included acquiring and providing data to the community to engage members in meaningful conversations about opioid misuse and abuse and gather insights to shape a response to the opioid crisis.

Methods: University of Minnesota School of Nursing faculty collaborated with community partner Hue-MAN Partnership, to develop and implement a Community Opioid Survey at neighborhood meetings. The MyStrengths+MyHealth assessment was used to identify strengths of community members. Community meetings included introductions by the Hue-MAN Partnership, presentation of the survey data, and facilitated discussion to involve community members in data interpretation and solution development.

Results: Data was collected at 11 community meetings between June 2018 and May 2019. Approximately half of respondents had been affected by opioid misuse or overdose; oxycodone was the most frequent opioid involved; community clinics were the most available resource; and community education was identified as a needed resource to reduce misuse and overdose. Communities perceived and used language differently in talking about opioids.

Conclusion: The community-academic- partnership enabled collection of community-specific data that may have been inaccessible to researchers working alone. Access to community-specific data holds promise for increasing research relevance and for engaging community knowledge and needs.

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Published

2022-05-24

How to Cite

Austin, R., Jones, C., Dominguez, A., Hawkins, D., Ondara, C., Haynes, D., Monsen, K., & Eder, M. (2022). Shifting the Opioid Conversation from Stigma to Strengths: Opportunities for Developing Community-Academic Partnerships. Interdisciplinary Journal of Partnership Studies, 9(1), Article 2. https://doi.org/10.24926/ijps.v9i1.4671

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From the Guest Editor