Document Type

Presentation

Session Description

When our core marketing course was cut from 3 to 1.5 credits, we developed a faculty-team approach to redesign the course. First, the six-person design team jointly determined a framework for the course, including the breadth and depth of topics to be covered, using syllabi from nine different MBA programs. Common course objectives and major deliverables were also established, including a pre-post marketing simulation. Next, seven faculty were selected to develop modules based on their specialty (i.e., what elective they teach). Each module consisted of readings, slides, video lecture, online quiz, and a concept application activity. A common slide template and structure maintained consistency across modules, and faculty were encouraged to promote their elective at the end of each lecture. All modules were loaded into a master Blackboard site. When a faculty is assigned to teach the course, the master becomes their starting point, from which they can personalize delivery through their welcome video, online and in-class discussions and activities, and the selection of cases that play to their strengths. There are many benefits to this model of course design: 1) students exposed to variety of faculty perspectives and lecture styles, 2) less prep time for core instructors means more time to focus on delivery and learning, 3) greater consistency across sections, 4) elective faculty can hold students accountable for core knowledge and then build onto it, 5) core video library becomes a student resource in electives, 6) elective enrollment should increase, and 7) faculty involved in the project gain experience developing an online course module.

Keywords

Master Course, Blended, Cooperative Design

Start Date

8-2-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

8-2-2017 2:00 PM

Brief Biography of Primary Presenter

Dr. Abendroth is an Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of St. Thomas and Faculty Director for the Part-Time Flex MBA. She helped transition core MBA courses to blended in 2012 and regularly measures student reaction to the format. In addition, she is a trained QM Peer Reviewer, chaired the online/blended university task-force, and currently chairs the college teaching committee.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Aug 2nd, 1:30 PM Aug 2nd, 2:00 PM

Building a Master Core Course: A Faculty Team Approach to Blended Course Design

When our core marketing course was cut from 3 to 1.5 credits, we developed a faculty-team approach to redesign the course. First, the six-person design team jointly determined a framework for the course, including the breadth and depth of topics to be covered, using syllabi from nine different MBA programs. Common course objectives and major deliverables were also established, including a pre-post marketing simulation. Next, seven faculty were selected to develop modules based on their specialty (i.e., what elective they teach). Each module consisted of readings, slides, video lecture, online quiz, and a concept application activity. A common slide template and structure maintained consistency across modules, and faculty were encouraged to promote their elective at the end of each lecture. All modules were loaded into a master Blackboard site. When a faculty is assigned to teach the course, the master becomes their starting point, from which they can personalize delivery through their welcome video, online and in-class discussions and activities, and the selection of cases that play to their strengths. There are many benefits to this model of course design: 1) students exposed to variety of faculty perspectives and lecture styles, 2) less prep time for core instructors means more time to focus on delivery and learning, 3) greater consistency across sections, 4) elective faculty can hold students accountable for core knowledge and then build onto it, 5) core video library becomes a student resource in electives, 6) elective enrollment should increase, and 7) faculty involved in the project gain experience developing an online course module.